Smile: The push to leave nothing sacred for African Americans

Posted on July 30, 2011

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Reviews are trickling in for the film version of The Help, and you can read the ones I’ve got posted here.

This post is a result of something that occurred on someone else’s blog.

Because the person’s movie review of  The Help wasn’t complimentary, an allegation of “racism” was made, or reverse-racism.

I just love debates like this, so of course I jumped right in. But it also gave me pause to think, and get additionally pissed about the notion of African Americans who don’t go along to get along, or have a contrary opinion as having an “attitude” or, as some used to love to claim back in the day, being “uppity.”

And if we were to go wayyyy back, in my mind I could see someone screaming for the overseer to bring the whip, “because that uppity nigra needs to be taught a lesson.” How dare they not enjoy The Help movie!

And how dare they express an opinion about it. Why, that’s just Un-American.

Bamboozled movie poster, which was a satirical and also serious look at how African Americans are stereotyped. A frustrated African American TV writer proposes a blackface minstrel show in protest, but to his chagrin it becomes a hit.

More info on Bamboozled

I’m not a morning person. And I’m also not perky or chipper enough to have a smile plastered on my face 24/7. There are some people who find this unacceptable, and you can tell when they blare out “Smile! Things can’t be that bad” or the one that’s sure to bring an embaressed grin “You’re too pretty not to smile.”

Either way its annoying. If it’s your face, you should have the right to have whatever expression you choose.

If I’m deep in thought over a problem at work why the hell would have have a goofy grin that makes it seem as though I don’t know my head from my ass?

This is what I was taught from childhood:

Speak/greet before spoken to.

Knock before entering

Say “Thank you,” “May I,”  “Please,” “Excuse me” and “I’m sorry” when warranted.

Don’t let shit roll downhill. In other words, don’t make YOUR problem someone else’s.

And smile only when you feel like it. Because for far too long African Americans were required to

grin and cower at someone else’s command. Those days are over.

Above all, just because others don’t follow the same procedure, that doesn’t mean jack. You be you.

So this trend that I’m seeing, where there’s a “push” to bring the funny to a number of subjects, even those which different cultures find sacred won’t get my support.

I’m speaking of not only Kathryn Stockett and her director pal Tate Taylor’s insistence on making segregation “fun” so that its not uncomfortable for their coveted marketing group (white women).

But how some whites (not all, let me point that out) tolerate little in the way of hilarity regarding certain subjects, (9/11, Princess Diana, The Holocaust, etc.) Yet there’s a double standard when it comes to negative experiences in history that effect minorities.

In order to find closure in this whole “racial” thing, the push has been on for a while now to get African Americans (and other minority groups) to loosen up. Yeah, that’s it. Because at least for blacks,  if we laugh off segregation, we’ll be more well balanced and happy in our lives. That way if someone makes a bigoted joke, we won’t notice it, because as the saying goes “We don’t know any better.”

So reminders of the negative impact of segregation or what the civil rights movement  accomplished just won’t do. Especially if there’s no white person at the helm. I call this the “Blindside” effect. Others call it the “White Savior” trope.

See, in America, we want our blacks to be “happy.” It appears the only way this can be accomplished is if they forget all about the oppression of segregation and the years of  bad things like rape, lynchings, separate but unequal educational institutions and the denial of medical care, legal injustice . . .  Oh hell, just go see The Help and forget all your troubles black people!

Because if some African Americans continue to harp and criticize, well, I think Laura Schlessinger  was one of the first to publicly state it in her infamous radio rant:

Laura Schlessinger - The "doctor" was out to lunch in this rant

Schlessinger: Chip on your shoulder. I can’t do much about that.

Caller: It’s not like that.

Schlessinger: Yeah. I think you have too much sensitivity –

Caller: So it’s OK to say “n*****”?

Schlessinger:and not enough sense of humor.

Jumping to the end of Schlessinger’s career crashing thoughts (items in bold are my doing):

Schlessinger: All right. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Can’t have this argument. You know what? If you’re that hypersensitive about color and don’t have a sense of humor, don’t marry out of your race. If you’re going to marry out of your race, people are going to say, “OK, what do blacks think? What do whites think? What do Jews think? What do Catholics think?” Of course there isn’t a one-think per se. But in general there’s “think.”

And what I just heard from Jade is a lot of what I hear from black-think – and it’s really distressting [sic] and disturbing. And to put it in its context, she said the N-word, and I said, on HBO, listening to black comics, you hear “n*****, n*****, n*****.” I didn’t call anybody a n*****. Nice try, Jade. Actually, sucky try.

Need a sense of humor, sense of humor – and answer the question. When somebody says, “What do blacks think?” say, “This is what I think. This is what I read that if you take a poll the majority of blacks think this.” Answer the question and discuss the issue. It’s like we can’t discuss anything without saying there’s -isms?

We have to be able to discuss these things. We’re people – goodness gracious me. Ah – hypersensitivity, OK, which is being bred by black activists. I really thought that once we had a black president, the attempt to demonize whites hating blacks would stop, but it seems to have grown, and I don’t get it. Yes, I do. It’s all about power. I do get it. It’s all about power and that’s sad because what should be in power is not power or righteousness to do good – that should be the greatest power.

http://ricksanchez.blogs.cnn.com/2010/08/13/dr-laura-schlessingers-rant/ (ironic that Sanchez did the same thing a big later on)

Now, Schlessinger’s rant would have made points had she not been the guilty party. Because here’s how it all started:

(Yes, I’m posting the whole thing, because only by reading the entire transcript can the full impact of Schlessinger’s twisted “unprofessional opinion” be revealed):

Caller: OK. Last night – good example – we had a neighbor come over, and this neighbor – when every time he comes over, it’s always a black comment. It’s, “Oh, well, how do you black people like doing this?” And, “Do black people really like doing that?” And for a long time, I would ignore it. But last night, I got to the point where it –

Schlessinger: I don’t think that’s racist.

Caller: Well, the stereotype –

Schlessinger: I don’t think that’s racist. No, I think that -

Caller: [unintelligible]

Schlessinger: No, no, no. I think that’s – well, listen, without giving much thought, a lot of blacks voted for Obama simply ’cause he was half-black. Didn’t matter what he was gonna do in office, it was a black thing. You gotta know that. That’s not a surprise. Not everything that somebody says – we had friends over the other day; we got about 35 people here – the guys who were gonna start playing basketball. I was going to go out and play basketball. My bodyguard and my dear friend is a black man. And I said, “White men can’t jump; I want you on my team.” That was racist? That was funny.

Caller: How about the N-word? So, the N-word’s been thrown around –

Schlessinger: Black guys use it all the time. Turn on HBO, listen to a black comic, and all you hear is n*****, n*****, n*****.

Caller: That isn’t –

Schlessinger: I don’t get it. If anybody without enough melanin says it, it’s a horrible thing; but when black people say it, it’s affectionate. It’s very confusing. Don’t hang up, I want to talk to you some more. Don’t go away.

I’m Dr. Laura Schlessinger. I’ll be right back.

After taking a commercial break, Schlessinger resumed her discussion with the caller:

Schlessinger: I’m Dr. Laura Schlessinger, talking to Jade. What did you think about during the break, by the way?

Caller: I was a little caught back by the N-word that you spewed out, I have to be honest with you. But my point is, race relations -

Schlessinger: Oh, then I guess you don’t watch HBO or listen to any black comedians.

Caller: But that doesn’t make it right. I mean, race is a [unintelligible] –

Schlessinger: My dear, my dear –

Caller: – since Obama’s been in office –

Schlessinger: – the point I’m trying to make –

Caller: – racism has come to another level that’s unacceptable.

Schlessinger: Yeah. We’ve got a black man as president, and we have more complaining about racism than ever. I mean, I think that’s hilarious.

Caller: But I think, honestly, because there’s more white people afraid of a black man taking over the nation.

Schlessinger: They’re afraid.

Caller: If you want to be honest about it [unintelligible]

Schlessinger: Dear, they voted him in. Only 12 percent of the population’s black. Whites voted him in.

Caller: It was the younger generation that did it. It wasn’t the older white people who did it.

Schlessinger: Oh, OK.

Caller: It was the younger generation –

Schlessinger: All right. All right.

Caller: – that did it.

Schlessinger: Chip on your shoulder. I can’t do much about that.

Caller: It’s not like that.

Schlessinger: Yeah. I think you have too much sensitivity –

Caller: So it’s OK to say “n*****”?

Schlessinger: – and not enough sense of humor.

Caller: It’s OK to say that word?

Schlessinger: It depends how it’s said.

Caller: Is it OK to say that word? Is it ever OK to say that word?

Schlessinger: It’s – it depends how it’s said. Black guys talking to each other seem to think it’s OK.

Caller: But you’re not black. They’re not black. My husband is white.

Schlessinger: Oh, I see. So, a word is restricted to race. Got it. Can’t do much about that.

Caller: I can’t believe someone like you is on the radio spewing out the “n*****” word, and I hope everybody heard it.

Schlessinger: I didn’t spew out the “n*****” word.

Caller: You said, “N*****, n*****, n*****.”

Schlessinger: Right, I said that’s what you hear.

Caller: Everybody heard it.

Schlessinger: Yes, they did.

Caller: I hope everybody heard it.

Schlessinger: They did, and I’ll say it again –

Caller: So what makes it OK for you to say the word?

Schlessinger: – n*****, n*****, n***** is what you hear on HB –

Caller: So what makes it –

Schlessinger: Why don’t you let me finish a sentence?

Caller: OK.

Schlessinger: Don’t take things out of context. Don’t double N – NAACP me. Tape the -

Caller: I know what the NAACP –

Schlessinger: Leave them in context.

Caller:I know what the N-word means and I know it came from a white person. And I know the white person made it bad.

Schlessinger: All right. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Can’t have this argument. You know what? If you’re that hypersensitive about color and don’t have a sense of humor, don’t marry out of your race. If you’re going to marry out of your race, people are going to say, “OK, what do blacks think? What do whites think? What do Jews think? What do Catholics think?” Of course there isn’t a one-think per se. But in general there’s “think.”

And what I just heard from Jade is a lot of what I hear from black-think – and it’s really distressting [sic] and disturbing. And to put it in its context, she said the N-word, and I said, on HBO, listening to black comics, you hear “n*****, n*****, n*****.” I didn’t call anybody a n*****. Nice try, Jade. Actually, sucky try.

Need a sense of humor, sense of humor – and answer the question. When somebody says, “What do blacks think?” say, “This is what I think. This is what I read that if you take a poll the majority of blacks think this.” Answer the question and discuss the issue. It’s like we can’t discuss anything without saying there’s -isms?

We have to be able to discuss these things. We’re people – goodness gracious me. Ah – hypersensitivity, OK, which is being bred by black activists. I really thought that once we had a black president, the attempt to demonize whites hating blacks would stop, but it seems to have grown, and I don’t get it. Yes, I do. It’s all about power. I do get it. It’s all about power and that’s sad because what should be in power is not power or righteousness to do good – that should be the greatest power.

http://ricksanchez.blogs.cnn.com/2010/08/13/dr-laura-schlessingers-rant/ (this link may not be any good. Especially since Rick Sanchez foolishly went on an anti-semitic rant of his own and was fired by CNN)

Yes, we have to be able to discuss why, when stereotypes of minorities appear (not just African Americans get caricatured)  any dissention is soundly dismissed because those who love these offensive images have no problem with them, sort of like Director Michael Bay’s statement when called out on his stereotypical transformers:

Jive-talking twin Transformers raise race issues

By Sandy Cohen, AP Entertainment Writer

Transformers ethnically uncouth, highly unfunny black "Bros" robots

” . . . American cinema also has a tendency to deal with race indirectly, said Allyson Nadia Field, an assistant professor of cinema and media studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

“There’s a persistent dehumanization of African-Americans throughout Hollywood that displaces issues of race onto non-human entities,” said Field, who also hasn’t seen the film. “It’s not about skin color or robot color. It’s about how their actions and language are coded racially.”

If these characters weren’t animated and instead played by real black actors, “then you might have to admit that it’s racist,” Robinson said. “But stick it into a robot’s mouth, and it’s just a robot, it’s OK.”

But if they’re alien robots, she continued, “why do they talk like bad black stereotypes?”

Bay brushes off any whiff of controversy.

“Listen, you’re going to have your naysayers on anything,” he said. “It’s like is everything going to be melba toast? It takes all forms and shapes and sizes.”

See the full article here:

Link: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090625/…_jar_jar_again

Born to serve Black zebras, in a scene from Disney's beloved classic "Fantasia"

Stop romanticizing prejudice

Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus had a 2010 great observation piece on both The Help and Governor Haley Barbour’s soft peddling , or as she says “romanticizing of prejudice”

In her 2010 article Marcus states:

“It’s too bad for Haley Barbour that he’s not in my book group.

Sure, the Mississippi governor and potential presidential candidate might feel a little out of place. He would be the only man — and, as it turns out, the only Republican.

But Barbour might have saved himself a heap of trouble if he had been with us Sunday night to talk about “The Help,” Kathryn Stockett’s novel about white women and their black maids in Mississippi during the 1960s.

Barbour is a smooth pol who seems to stumble whenever he encounters the subject of the South and race. When Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell erased slavery from the annual Confederacy Day proclamation, Barbour dismissed critics for “trying to make a big deal out of something that doesn’t matter for diddly.” His soft-focus recollection of the civil rights era makes “Gone With the Wind” look like a hit job on the Old Confederacy.

A few months back, Barbour gave an interview to Human Events, the conservative magazine, that wished away the South of fire hoses and church bombings. “My generation,” said Barbour, “went to integrated schools. I went to an integrated college — never thought about it.”

Perhaps he never thought about it because the actual facts were less pleasant. Barbour arrived at Ole Miss a few years after federal marshals were required to escort James Meredith onto the riot-torn campus. The schools in his hometown of Yazoo City were not integrated until 1970, by which point Barbour was in law school.”

As Marcus continues, she inserts information on Stockett’s novel:

“. . . Barbour is no dumb tactician. Rather, and this is where “The Help” comes in, they reflect the limits of Barbour’s cloistered worldview. Like the rest of us, his perceptions are inevitably skewed by the distorting lens of his background and upbringing.

. . . The unpleasantness of the civil rights movement is a subject to be diligently avoided. When one of the white women, Skeeter, begins to watch a TV report about Meredith at Ole Miss, her mother immediately flips the channel to Lawrence Welk, announcing, ‘Look, isn’t this so much nicer?'” After Skeeter anonymously publishes a book about the maids’ difficult and humiliating lives in “Niceville,” her friends can scarcely recognize themselves.

So when Barbour says he does not remember things “being that bad,” I suspect he is telling the truth. Barbour’s failing is not in his faulty memory. It is in his consistent unwillingness to recognize the edifice of self-serving myth on which he has constructed his comfortable conclusions. “

Read the full post here: http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2010/12/civil_rights_some_need_help_to.html

Look, just because Chris Rock or some other black comedian makes jokes, that doesn’t mean every black person believes the same shit is funny.

And just because actress Octavia Spencer made the decision to play what I consider a modern version of Mammy from Gone With The Wind, that doesn’t mean I’m required to laugh about it because some other blacks do. Spencer is listed as an actress/comedian. That’s her profession.

In order for me to laugh, it has to be funny TO ME.

And humor is subjective. Not required.

Celia Foote gets the squeals as the movie amps up the happiness factor during segregation

Celia gives Minny a hug, which is supposed to make moviegoers chuckle and go "Awww"

The screenshots above from the trailer don’t make me want to see the movie. They’re contrived, condescending bullshit as far as I’m concerned. Pre-meditated pandering in order for moviegoers to laugh.
I had enough of Stockett trying to force feed the unfunny and offensive coming ironically, from the black characters in The Help novel. I don’t need to see it on screen.
Especially when I recognize that my blues ain’t the same as yours.
You see, a big part of the problem with The Help and Schlessinger, Barbour, Stockett, Taylor, Bay and all those who want to not so subtly control the emotions of another race, is that they want to decide for me what I should and should not feel anger about. And what I should and shouldn’t laugh at. Just like during segregation.
African Americans weren’t supposed to get bent out of shape at Al Jolson in blackface, but “praise” how uncannily “authentic” he was:

Al Jolson, a beloved American entertainer in blackface

 
Sort of like all the praise Kathryn Stockett got for stereotypical, stupid ass dialogue and inner thoughts like this:
“You saying people think I got the black magic?” (Pg 24, Aibileen)
That night after supper, me and that cockroach stare each other down across the kitchen floor. He big, inch, inch an a half. He black. Blacker than me. Aibileen’s  battle of wills with a cockroach (Pg 189)

While visiting Constantine, this character talks about playing with two little girls  who were “so black I couldn’t tell them apart and called them both just Mary.” (Pg 62)  Skeeter

The women are tall, short, black like asphalt or caramel brown. If your skin is too white, I’m told,  you’ll never get hired The blacker the better. – (Pg 257) Skeeter

Plenty of black men leave their families behind like trash in a dump, but it’s just not nothing something the colored woman do. We’ve got the kids to think about. (Pg 311) Minny

“Week after Clyde left you, I heard that Cocoa wake up to her cootchie spoilt like a rotten oyster. Didn’t get better for three months. Bertrina, she good friends with Cocoa. She know your prayer works.” (Pg 24, Minny)

Stockett voices Minny talking "spoilt cootchies" at the Tower Theatre during her book tour

“You gone accuse me a philosophizing”
“Go ahead,” I say. “I ain’t afraid of no philosophy.” (Pg 311 Aibileen and Minny, again sounding like a female version of Amos n’ Andy)

“I told Shirley Boon her ass won’t fit on no stool at Woolworth’s anyway.” Minny speaking of a person holding a community meeting concerning the Woolworth sit-ins (Pg 217)

And I know there are plenty of other “colored” things I could do besides telling my stories or going to Shirley Boon’s meetings-the mass meetings in town, the marches in Birmingham, the voting rallies upstate. But truth is, I don’t care that much about voting. I don’t care about eating at a counter with white people. What I care about is, if in ten years, a white lady will call my girls dirty and accuse them of stealing silver. Minny (Pg 218)

Pretty maids all in a row. Only, where are the lighter complexioned maids?

 And a big WTF? For movie dialogue like this:
“Frying chicken make you tend to feel better about life,” (Minny, from the movie of The Help)
Really? I must remember that the next time I fry chicken. In fact, I should pass along this highly offensive BS to the next generation. Oh, someone has already beat me to it! Lookee thair, why if it ain’t little Tate Taylor, Kitty Stockett’s good friend and the screenwriter/director for The Help movie. No wonder it’s all about “Chicken” and other caricatures on black folk in the film, just like in the book:

Tate Taylor's Chicken Party

The subject of blacks and fried chicken even comes up in interviews for the film, as if the people behind the movie have no clue (or maybe they do, but don’t care like Michael Bay) about the long, disturbing history of African American stereotypes, which include blacks linked with specific foods during segregation.

“About 20 minutes into the movie, you’re craving fried chicken,” says director Tate Taylor. That movie is The Help, the new film based on Kathryn Stockett’s best-selling novel . . .”

Article link: http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/the-help-southern-food

1950s bigoted advertising, for of all things, blacks and fried chicken

During slavery and segregation, African Americans were told they did not have the right of a self identity.
Everything was controlled. Even our image.
What saddened whites was also supposed to sadden us. What they loved, we were required to love.
And some blacks fell for this brain washing. So much so that its no wonder there’s a confusion still among some African Americans regarding their own culture. But what should never be forgotten is how the bigoted ideology of segregation dictated how blacks were to be treated.
African American males were esmaculated to the point it was required that they bow and grovel in the presence of someone white. Still, utter humiliation wasn’t enough. The slightest perception of any black acting “uppity” could result in an assault, being run out of town or worse yet, a lynching. And far too many were labled as “no account” and also absentee fathers, violence prone (something Kathryn Stockett does in her novel with the characters of Clyde,  Connor and Leroy). Black males were depicted as sexual predators lusting solely after white females while abusing the women of their own race. Under segregation African Americans could do no right, while whites were benevolent and good for simply tolerating us, and could do no wrong.  
African American women and girls were targets of sexual assaults. Danielle McGuire’s At The Dark End of The Street details several actual cases, where a sixteen year old on her way to a prom was taken at gunpoint from her date’s automobile and a twenty-four year old wife and mother was accosted on her way home from church. Each of them were brutally gang raped.
In far too many of these real life cases, the attackers bragged of their deeds but were never convicted. And the victims, no matter how young were portrayed as sexually promiscuous.
Only recently has it been revealed that even Rosa Parks was almost raped, as per an essay found among  her personal papers.

Rosa Parks essay reveals rape attempt

Ula Ilnytzky/ Associated Press

” . . . Civil rights historian Danielle McGuire said she had never before heard of the attempted rape of Parks and called the find among Parks’ papers astounding.

It helps explain what triggered Parks’ lifelong campaign against the ritualistic rape of black women by white men, said McGuire, whose recent book “At the Dark End of the Street” examines how economic intimidation and sexual violence were used to derail the freedom movement and how it went unpunished during the Jim Crow era.

” . . . Of her own experience, Parks wrote, “He offered me a drink of whiskey, which I promptly and vehemently refused. . He moved nearer to me and put his hand on my waist. I was very frightened by now.”

“He liked me. .. he didn’t want me to be lonely and would I be sweet to him. He had money to give me for accepting his attentions,” she wrote.

“I was ready to die but give my consent never. Never, never.”
Read the full article from The Detroit News:  

Added to the oppression, assaults, rapes, lynchings, demeaning depictions in advertising, literature and film were the rules on how “Good Negroes” should behave.
Blacks who were a “Credit to their race” got praise like the Mammy monument proposed in the early 1920s (items in bold are my doing):

Mammy monument aritcle pg 1

 Transcribed  for easier reading:

DESERVES A MONUMENT

Plan to memorialize the “Black Mammy” wins favor.

From Galveston comes a suggestion full of the noblest sentiment, and in that city

and by the very pick and flower of its business men there has been set on foot

a movement which should receive the aid of people everywhere, and especially

of the people of the South: and if there be any difference at all in the measure

of obligation among that people the measure is largest on the part of those who

can remember the dark old “black mammy” of the days of long ago.

The movement has for its object the erection of a monument to perpetuate the

Memory of the “black mammies” of the South. What that homely and familiar

phrase means countless thousands can testify, and how hearts are stirred, and how the

fountain of tears, touched by memory’s magic wand, sends forth its tribute to grateful

love, there is many a witness to testify who looks back toward the past through

the mist of unbidden tears. That the people of Galveston, who have displayed such

splendid courage, and so loftily illustrated the highest type of

Mammy monument pg 2

 civic fidelity and virtue, should be first to move in a matter so utterly disconnected from every thought of gain,

and born solely of tender sentiment, adds another flower to their chapter of honor.

A monument in honor of the “black mammies” would be unique among memorials,

because the “black mammy” was unique.

She has no model or counterpart in all history. No character in all the social or domestic

realm of any land or any age of which there is preserved the memory in history

or tradition filled her place or would serve as a standard whereby to measure the

value of her simple and unselfish service or the duration of her influence.

She was essentially sui generis. The past furnished no precedent, the present

had no parallel. Wholly unlearned, without even the rudiments of education,

holding with unshakable belief to all manner of superstition, filled with terror

and direful foreboding if the “squeech” owl was heard even once at twilight:

Stopping to break, by some rude incantation the “spell” if the “molly cottontail”

crossed the road ahead of her: believing in “hants” and “sperrits” and “ghostes”

even as she believed in her own identity: with hell fire and brimstone as essential

ingredients of her religious belief-she yet was the truest, most faithful, most

trustful, most devoted creature that ever served with simple faith and love

sincere in the sphere “in which it had pleased God to place her”

How intense was her pride in her “white folks!” How tender, how constant was her

love for her white “chillums!” How lordly, how sovereign her

Mammy monument pg 3

contempt for all those who, according to her ideals were not “quality folks!”

She was the aristocrat of aristocrats, the patrician of patricians; no standard so

high as hers, no test of “quality” and blood so inexorably rigid. She was the

self-appointed and watchful guardian of the dignity, pride, and honor of the

“fambly”

Whatever concerned her “white folks” concerned her. If she belonged to them,

they in a different –but in her sight no less real-sense belonged to her, and she

was ever ready to defend with the zeal of the fanatic the faith to which she held,

That they were “the qualityest people that ever was,” and that to compare with

them any measured not up to her standard was profanation unpardonable.

Her faith in God was the simple, trusting faith of childhood, unclouded by doubt,

undisturbed by mysticism or metaphysical refinement, which had no place in the

narrow field of her mental operations.

The crude prayers framed by her unlearned lips were lifted to the heaven

in which she believed, with the unquestioning faith that they would be heard and answered by a merciful Father who

Mammy monument pg 4

ruled and reigned there.

Many a man and woman whom the world acclaims great knelt at “black

mammy’s”  knees to say his and her evening prayer, and was soothed to sleep

in the big black arms by the crooning of her lullaby songs, and, no matter how many

years have passed, or how far they have wandered, in her eyes they are her

“chillun.”

Let memorials to “black mammy” be built in every state but no genius can conceive

nor constructive skill fashion shaft or column or  monument which will

worthily symbolize her patience, her love, her fidelity. Yet let the best be done

that lies within the compass of artistic power. Her memory will outlive granite

and marble and bronze. Though her skin was black, her soul was white, and in

that land where God giveth the faithful rest the voice which hummed and crooned

soft and tender lullabies here will join the everlasting song – Houston Chronicle

See Constantine, Aibileen and Minny from The Help as modern examples of  “The Black Mammy” spirit expressed in this 1920s article. Seems we’ll have a “Mammy monument”
after all, only it’ll be on the silver screen come August 10th.
Want to know more about The National Mammy monument, a symbol of segregation that was almost built in our Nation’s capital? Then read this post. See the similarities it shares with The Help.
This post is still in development . . .  
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